Showing: 1 - 1 of 1 RESULTS

Agricultural Sheds – Construction and Planning

agricultural shed

Aged to be centuries old, two agricultural shed have been created within the small town of Federal in New South Wales to endure at least 300 years in a location that is well concealed in the natural forest. Constructed as barns during the colonial times, the sheds were meant for horse and cattle travelling through the forest and the associated hardships it caused. To make the barn more user-friendly and safe for passage through the dense forests of the outback, plans were made to build lighthouses along the banks of the river separating Federal andzac country. These lighthouses still exist today and provide shelter to many indigenous tribes still living off the land. The sheds were designed to be long-lasting structures, built to withstand the hostile environment that they were exposed to in days gone by.

Agricultural Sheds – How to
Do Construction and Planning

The first steel agricultural shed was constructed in 1850 near what is now Armidale, in what is now the Blue Mountains. Designed to last more than a century, the structure was created using the most durable materials that were then available. Made with high-density polyethylene and stainless steel, the steel construction was then covered with a durable layer of corrugated metal to further enhance its longevity. A polyethylene roof then went around the entire building, whilst the floors were covered in a thick layer of solid sand.

Only the original foundation was covered in sand, but the rest remained in a loose soil that has since been compacted. Despite the compacted soil and difficulty in digging, the structure was constructed and remains so to this day. Although the original plan was for the farm buildings to be underground, with the original foundations made with concrete blocks, a planning authority in New South Wales subsequently changed the plan to cover only the foundation. This meant that the shed was now to be located on the ground floor with access through a ladder to the roof. With this change the plans allowed for two additional sheds to be constructed at locations to the immediate right and left of the original farm house.